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City of Sydney

Sydney Lunar Festival Banner Galleries

When

Every day, 12am to 6pm Saturday 29 January to Sunday 13 February

Cost

Five Asian–Australian artists share what the Year of the Tiger mean for them in a series of colourful, bright and engaging banner artworks displayed on our outdoor banner galleries.

Galleries will be in the following locations:

  • Andrew Yee: George Street (between Alfred Street and Angel Place)

  • Claudie Chan Shaw: George Street (from Martin Place to Bathurst Street)

  • Hyun-Hee Lee: Liverpool Street (between Sussex Street and Castlereagh Street)

  • Nani Puspasari: Hay Street (between Pitt Street and Castlereagh Street)

  • Rosemary Fung: Alfred St

About the artists work:

Andrew Yee: Then & Now

Then & Now is a collection of works celebrating a handful of Sydney’s iconic Asian businesses that have shut their doors or suffered from the Covid-19 pandemic. Every piece juxtaposes the fierce tiger against each establishment’s iconic facade to create empowering images, showing just how vital they were to Sydney’s identity.

Claudia Chan Shaw: Tiger Tiger

The Tiger design looks to the past for inspiration, but has a confident, fresh approach, much like the characteristics of those born in the year of the Tiger.

With its intense gaze, the distinctive tiger has stripes made from fragments of Chinese calligraphy, taken from a famous Tang Dynasty poem by the renowned poet Li Bai.

Hyun-Hee Lee: Cultural Connections

The artwork is an amalgamation of Western and Korean ideas and content. The colours and lines are presented in a contemporary context reflecting the youth and energy of Australia but also understanding the heritage of its people. Using these traditional symbolic color references for Lunar New Year provides a symbiotic connection to culture, harmony and a cause for celebration on this important occasion.

Nani Puspasari: Year of the Tiger - the Guardian

The artwork inspired by Chinese New Year prosperity posters from the late 1970s and ‘80s with the message to wish health, fortune, and good luck for the coming year.

The symbolism of the Tiger in Chinese culture is as diverse as the majesty creature itself. In Chinese folklore, the Guardian tiger are believed to be a powerful creature because it can keep away from the three major disasters that affect households: fire, thieves, and evil spirits and to be able to protect children and heal ill patients.

Rosemary Fung: CNY 2022 - Day and Night

As an Australian-Chinese lion dancer, my personal experience of the Lunar New Year has always been defined by our lively performances all over Sydney. From traditional shop blessings in Chinatown, to LED dragons and lions lighting up the harbour at Circular Quay, CNY 2022: Day and Night aims to capture the spirit of these scenes through three sets of two banners, featuring the Dragon, the Lion, and the zodiac Tiger. Each pair consists of a red Day version recalling a traditional festive ambience, and a complementary Night version, which transforms the same theme into a modern display of dazzling light.

Listen to an audio description of these artworks.

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